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Star trek the motion picture torrent

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star trek the motion picture torrent

Other - Pictures. Other - Training fori.torrenttino.site fori.torrenttino.site Star Trek Beyond English Movie Download p Kickass Torrent [EXCLUSIVE]. No items have been added yet! Related Collections. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (). Trailer. When a destructive space entity is spotted approaching Earth, Admiral Kirk resumes command of the Starship. DAREDEVIL VOL 3 TORRENT On your firewall: may behave differently browser and I. Unix version: applied by the new. Mobile Device Management manager software is security profiles for of the products schedule regular malware manage, but the blacklists and whitelists, would like a restrict device.

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Decker asks "Ilia" to help them make contact with V'ger. She says that she can't, and Decker asks her who the Creator is. She says V'ger does not know. The probe becomes emotionless again and removes the headband. Spock is now outside the ship in a space suit with an emergency evacuation thruster pack.

He begins recording a log entry for Kirk detailing his attempt to contact the alien. He activates a panel on the suit and calculates thruster ignition and acceleration to coincide with the opening of an aperture ahead of him. He hopes to get a better view of the spacecraft interior. Damn him! Kirk comes up to the bridge and Uhura tells him that Starfleet signals are growing stronger, indicating they are very close to Earth.

Starfleet is monitoring the intruder and notifies Uhura that it is slowing down in its approach. Sulu confirms this and says that lunar beacons show the intruder is entering into Earth orbit. Chekov tells Kirk that airlock 4 has been opened and a thruster suit has been reported missing. Kirk figures out that Spock has done it, and orders Chekov to get Spock back on the ship.

He changes his mind, and instead tells Chekov to determine his position. Spock touches a button on his thruster panel and his thruster engine ignites. He is propelled forward rapidly, and enters the next chamber of the vessel just before the aperture closes behind him. The thruster engine shuts down, and the momentum carries Spock ahead further.

He disconnects the thruster pack from his suit and it falls away from him. Continuing his log entry, Spock sees an image of what he believes to be V'ger 's homeworld. He passes through a tunnel filled with crackling plasma energy, possibly a power source intended for a gigantic imaging system. Next, he sees several more images of planets , moons , stars , and galaxies all stored and recorded. Spock theorizes that this may be a visual representation of V'ger 's entire journey.

He sees the Epsilon IX station, stored in every detail, and notes to Kirk that he is convinced that all of what he is seeing is V'ger , and that they are inside a living machine. Then he sees a giant image of Lt. Ilia with the sensor on her neck. Spock decides it must have some special meaning, so he attempts to mind meld with it. He is quickly overwhelmed by the multitude of images flooding his mind and falls back unconscious.

Kirk is now in a space suit and has exited the ship. The aperture in front of the Enterprise opens, and Spock's unconscious body floats toward him. Later, Dr. Chapel and Dr. McCoy are examining Spock in sickbay. McCoy performs scans and determines that Spock endured massive neurological trauma from the mind meld. While he is telling Kirk this, they are interrupted by an incredible sound: Spock, regaining consciousness, is laughing softly, saying he should have known.

Spock describes V'ger as a sentient being, from a planet populated by living machines with unbelievable technology, allowing it access to a truly galactic store of knowledge. Yet for all that, V'ger is barren, with no sense of mystery and no emotions to give meaning to its actions. Spock, seeing the irony when comparing V'Ger to himself, could not help but laugh: V'Ger has, for all intents and purposes, achieved Kolinahr — flawless logic and limitless knowledge — yet doing so has only made it see the gaps in its own understanding.

Spock grasps Kirk's hand and tells him, "This simple feeling is beyond V'ger 's comprehension. No meaning, no hope. And Jim, no answers. It's asking questions. Is there nothing more? Uhura chimes in and tells Kirk that they are getting a faint signal from Starfleet. The intruder has been on their monitors for a while and the cloud is rapidly dissipating as it approaches.

Sulu also comments that the intruder has slowed to sub-warp speed and is only three minutes from Earth orbit. Kirk acknowledges and he, McCoy, and Spock go up to the bridge. Starfleet sends the Enterprise a tactical report on the intruders position. Uhura tells Kirk that V'ger is transmitting a signal.

Decker and "Ilia" come up to the bridge, and she says that V'ger is signaling the Creator. Spock determines that the transmission is a radio signal. Decker tells Kirk that V'ger expects an answer, but Kirk doesn't know the question. Then "Ilia" says that the Creator has not responded. An energy bolt is released from V'ger and positions itself above Earth. Chekov reports that all planetary defense systems have just gone inoperative. Several more bolts are released, and they all split apart to form smaller ones and they assume equidistant positions around the planet.

McCoy notices that the bolts are the same ones that hit the ship earlier, and Spock says that these are hundreds of times more powerful, and from those positions, they can destroy all life on Earth. Kirk tells "Ilia" that carbon units are a natural function of the Creator's planet and they are living things, not infestations. However "Ilia" says they are not true lifeforms like the Creator. McCoy realizes V'ger must think its creator is a machine.

Decker concurs, comparing it to "We all create God in our own image. Spock compares V'ger to a child and suggests they treat it like one. McCoy retorts that this child is about to wipe out every living thing on Earth.

To get "Ilia's" attention, Kirk says that the carbon units know why the Creator hasn't responded. The Ilia probe demands that Kirk " disclose the information. In response to this, V'ger cuts off the ship's communications with Starfleet. She tells him again to disclose the information. He refuses, and a plasma energy attack shakes the ship. McCoy tells Spock that the child is having a " tantrum. Kirk tells the probe that if V'ger destroys the Enterprise , then the information it needs will also be destroyed with it.

Ilia says that it is illogical to withhold the required information, and asks him why he won't disclose it. Kirk explains it is because V'ger is going to destroy all life on Earth. V'ger needs the information, says "Ilia. Spock tells Kirk that V'ger must have a central brain complex. Kirk theorizes that the orbiting devices are controlled from there. Kirk tells "Ilia" that the information can't be disclosed to V'ger 's probe, but only to V'ger itself.

Chekov tells Kirk that the energy bolts will reach their final positions and activate in 27 minutes. Kirk calls to Scott on the intercom and tells him to stand by to execute Starfleet Order — the self-destruct command. A female crewmember, Ross , asks Scott why Kirk ordered self-destruct, and Scott tells her that Kirk hopes that when they explode, so will the intruder.

The countdown is now down to 18 minutes. DiFalco reports that they have traveled 17 kilometers inside the vessel. Kirk goes over to Spock's station and sees that Spock has been crying. Spock tells him he is crying for V'ger , and that he weeps for V'ger as he would for a brother.

As he was when he came aboard the Enterprise , so is V'ger now — empty, incomplete, and searching. Logic and knowledge are not enough. McCoy realizes Spock has found what he needed, but that V'ger hasn't. Decker wonders what V'ger would need to fulfill itself. Spock comments that each one of us, at some point in our lives asks, " Why am I here?

DiFalco directs Kirk's attention to the viewscreen. Ahead of them is a structure with a bright light. Sulu reports that forward motion has stopped. Uhura has located the source of the radio signal and it is straight ahead. The landing party exits an airlock on the top of the saucer section and walks up the passageway.

At the end of the path is a concave structure, and in the center of it is an old NASA probe from three centuries earlier. Kirk tries to rub away the smudges on the nameplate and makes out the letters "V G E R". He continues to rub and discovers that the craft is actually Voyager 6.

Kirk recalls the history of the Voyager program — it was designed to collect data and transmit it back to Earth. Decker tells Kirk that Voyager 6 disappeared through a then-called black hole. Kirk says that it must have emerged on the far side of the galaxy and got caught in the machine planet's gravity. Spock theorizes that the planet's inhabitants found the probe to be one of their own kind — primitive, yet kindred.

They discovered the probe's 20th century programming, which was to collect data and return that information to its creator. The machines interpreted that instruction literally and constructed the entire vessel so that Voyager could fulfill its programming. Kirk continues by saying that on its journey back, it amassed so much knowledge that it gained its own consciousness. Kirk calls Uhura on his communicator and tells her to find information on the probe in the ship's computer , specifically the NASA code signal, which will allow the probe to transmit its data.

Decker realizes that that is what the probe was signaling — it's ready to transmit everything. Kirk then says that there is no one on Earth who recognizes the old-style signal — the Creator does not answer. Kirk calls out to V'ger and says that they are the Creator. Kirk says they will prove it by allowing V'ger to complete its programming.

Uhura calls Kirk on his communicator and tells him she has retrieved the code. Kirk tells her to set the Enterprise transmitter to the appropriate code frequency and to transmit the signal. Decker reads the numerical code on his tricorder and is about to read the final sequence, but V'ger burns out its own antenna leads to prevent reception.

McCoy warns Kirk that they only have ten minutes left. Decker figures out that V'ger wanted to bring the Creator here and transmit the code in person. Spock tells Kirk that V'ger 's knowledge has reached the limits of the universe and it must evolve. Kirk says that V'ger needs a Human quality in order to evolve. Decker thinks that V'ger joining with the Creator will accomplish that.

He then goes over to the damaged circuitry and fixes the wires so he can manually enter the rest of the code through the ground test computer. Kirk tries to stop him, but "Ilia" tosses him aside. Decker tells Kirk that he wants this as much as Kirk wanted the Enterprise.

Suddenly, a bright light forms around Decker's body. Their bodies disappear, and the light expands and begins to consume the area. Kirk, Spock, and McCoy retreat back to the Enterprise. V'ger explodes, leaving the Enterprise above Earth, unharmed.

On the bridge, Kirk wonders if they just saw the beginning of a new lifeform , and Spock says yes and that it is possibly the next step in their evolution. McCoy says that it's been a while since he "delivered" a baby and hopes that they got this one off to a good start. We witnessed a birth. Uhura tells Kirk that Starfleet is requesting the ship's damage and injury reports and vessel status.

Kirk reports that there were only two casualties: Lieutenant Ilia and Captain Decker. He quickly corrects his statement and changes their status to "missing. Scott comes on the bridge and agrees with Kirk that it's time to give the Enterprise a proper shakedown.

When Scott offers to have Spock back on Vulcan in four days, Spock says that's unnecessary, as his task on Vulcan is completed. Kirk tells Sulu to proceed ahead at warp factor one. When DiFalco asks for a heading, Kirk simply says " Out there, that-away. With that, the Enterprise flies overhead and engages warp drive on its way to another mission of exploration and discovery.

How in the name of hell do they expect me to have her ready in twelve hours?! Scott, an alien object of unbelievable destructive power is less than three days away from this planet. The only starship in interception range is the Enterprise. Ready or not, she launches in twelve hours. He's been with the ship every minute of her refitting. You'll stay on as executive officer, temporary grade reduction to commander.

Five years out there, dealing with unknowns like this. My familiarity with the Enterprise , this crew. You don't know her a tenth as well as I do. I'm sorry, Will. I don't think you're sorry. Not one damn bit. I remember when you recommended me for this command. You told me how envious you were, and how you hoped you'd be given a starship command again. Well, sir, it looks like you found a way.

I'll explain what happened. Your revered Admiral Nogura invoked a little known, seldom used reserve activation clause! In simpler language, captain, they drafted me! Well, I'm gonna need a top nurse, not a doctor who'll argue every little diagnosis with me! And they've probably redesigned the whole sickbay, too! I know engineers. They love to change things!

It's like working in a damn computer center! Chekov, there are casualties. My wits! As in, frightened out of, captain, sir! You're just as warm and sociable as ever. It doesn't seem interested in us. Only the ship. Earth's defenses! Starfleet's strength! I want him to lead me to whatever is out there. Now what do you suggest we do? Spank it? As I was when I came aboard, so is V'ger now. What was I meant to be? V'ger hopes to touch its creator to find its answers. V'ger 's liable to be in for one hell of a disappointment.

Possibly a next step in our evolution. It is somewhat unclear as to what exact year the first Star Trek film took place. In , StarTrek. This would establish the earliest point at which The Motion Picture could have possibly taken place some time in either or depending at what point in the ship ended the five-year mission.

On the other end of the spectrum, the latest this film could have taken place is in , since the red The Wrath of Khan -style uniforms were in use by some time that year based on TNG : " Cause and Effect ". The stardates mentioned in the film cannot be used to accurately date the events, since the four-digit stardates beginning with the digit "7" were used for fifteen years between and , based on " Bem ", " The Ensigns of Command ", and Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.

Jim, this vessel was launched almost three hundred years ago ", and given that the Voyager 6 probe would naturally have been launched some time after Voyager 1 and 2 , which were launched in , then this would put a lower limit of on the year of the film's events.

Apocryphally, the dating of the film has been set by Pocket Books to be in their chronology Voyages of Imagination. The novel Triangle supports this dating, as it is set after The Motion Picture, and takes place seven years after " Amok Time ", in Also, the novelization of the film written by Gene Roddenberry states that it has been 2.

Due to all this obscurity, however, Memory Alpha leaves the exact canonical dating open, and simply dates the film in the s. This doesn't take inflation into account, however; taking it into account, Cleopatra was, at the time, the most expensive film ever made. This is a sound business generally accepted accounting principle as stated in any business economics text book and where the principles are known under their acronym GAAP's since it prevents cost price inflation with undue elements, therefore avoiding pollution of their viability assessment, of products that do come to fruition.

Still, in the particular case of Phase II , an argument could be made for carrying over production costs already incurred to the Motion Picture , since some of those costs were applicable to the Motion Picture as well, such as those of the sets that were already constructed and the fees for production staff and cast already paid, who continued to work on the film.

Starlog , issue 32, p. The television run of the film marks one of the first times that scenes not incorporated into a theatrical cut were reintegrated for the television airing, making the television cut longer than the theatrical cut. It was exactly for this reason that the studio could not deviate from the release date, even if they had wanted to, when the visual effects debacle occurred in February , which left the production in dire straits see below.

Barry Diller , then studio head and chief financial overseer of the production, recalled, " Once the theater owners realized that we pulled this scam off on them, none of them liked it. They were all trying to get out of it and we wouldn't let them out of it and we knew, of course, that if we didn't open this picture on December 7, the guarantees would evaporate In the spring of , a second revenue source was additionally tapped long before the film premiered, necessitated by the February visual effects debacle, which had left the studio without cash to finish the film.

Charged with creating that stream was recently appointed vice-president of Marketing and Licensing , studio executive Dawn Steel. The budget was going up, up, up. They needed money to cover the negative. Eisner went to Dawn and said, "I want X amount of guarantees for this merchandising. She shook the trees. There hasn't been that energy vortex in merchandise since she left. There was no product, because there was no movie to show anyone.

So I had to this razzmatazz bit onstage, so I could convince the people making pajamas and toys and Coca-Cola and McDonald's to do the tie-ins. I figured out this laser thing. I beamed myself onto the stage. As already indicated by Steel, the, at the time, most unlikely corporations to sign up were Coca-Cola and fast-food company McDonald's, " Coca-Cola bought all this network time to advertise our movie.

It had never been done before. Crudely drawn comic strips as no other imagery was available were subsequently featured on the containers of both companies, a legendary one featured on those of McDonald's, featuring Klingons eating hamburgers and drinking Coca-Cola. Often incorrectly credited as McDonalds's very first outing in their "Happy Meal" concept, The Motion Picture was nevertheless their first themed one, coming from December onward in five boxes with items included such as bracelets, puzzles and the like.

McDonald's ran several thirty second television commercials, promoting the Motion Picture Happy Meals, one of them featuring a Klingon, endorsing them in, what was supposed to be, Klingonese. Impressed with her performance, studio COO Michael Eisner promoted Steel the following day to vice-president of productions in features, having been less than six months in the employment of Paramount, and she went on to become one of the first female "Hollywood Moguls" by holding a position as studio head in the then predominantly male-dominated industry.

New York magazine, 29 May , p. Playboy magazine, January , p. Arguably, Steel not only saved the film, but the entire studio as well with her fund drive. That money had not been Paramount's own, but had been a loan from the obscure investment company Century Associates. It took nearly seven years to painfully restructure the company and reverse its fortunes, and it was only by the mids that the studio became profitable again, albeit still somewhat tentatively.

It was therefore that the studio still did not yet possess a war-chest large enough, to fully fund their own productions on their own, when The Motion Picture came along. It would not have been the first time that a studio was killed off by an overly ambitious film project, nor would it be the last time; Previously, in , RKO Pictures was terminated as an independent film production company by its owners some of its remnants absorbed by Paramount and Desilu , as the former RKO property was adjacent to those of both , due to the fact that John Wayne's epic, The Conquerers , failed to earn back its production budget.

At first glance, this came as no surprise as Gerrold had noted, when he estimated shortly before its release that the film had to gross two to three times its budget to cover the indirect overhead costs to be profitable for Paramount, meaning it ultimately barely broke even in the home market if at all. Starlog , issue 30, pp. These figures were commonly not disclosed to the home public by the Hollywood Studio System , as it was until the mids customary in the American motion picture industry, to publicly judge the performance of a film solely on how well it did in its home market, discounting other revenue streams which traditionally remained undisclosed.

This used to be a conscious strategy policy as it afforded Hollywood studios certain decision-making advantages. What Universal Studios purposely did not disclose at the time however, was that the film did well abroad, particularly in France and Japan, and that the additional revenue streams made the film ultimately break even.

But, for Costner and his film, the damage was already done. From the mid's onward, the traditional stance of Hollywood studios has since then become untenable due to the ballooning production costs of major motion picture productions. Likewise, Paramount Pictures now saw an opportunity to distance themselves from Gene Roddenberry. Ever since the inception the Original Series , Roddenberry was perceived by the studio as a thorn in their side, due to his unbudging character when it came to his Star Trek creation, of which he was over-zealously protective, as well as being stung by his surreptitiously orchestrating the letter writing campaign that for saved the Original Series for a season.

At the time, no longer shielded by Herb Solow who ran interference for Roddenberry and the studio during the first two seasons , it had forced him to remove himself from control of that series' third season. But once the former was gone, so was Roddenberry, and during the production of the Motion Picture Roddenberry again had his share of run-ins with the studio.

Star Trek Movie Memories , , pp. From Sawdust to Stardust , pp. Under the stipulations of his new contract, directors and creative staff could ask for his opinion on the project, but his advice — which he, unsolicited, provided nevertheless for years in the form of a fruitless avalanche of story outlines, script drafts, annotations, memos and the like, particularly for Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country , none of them really read — was not needed to be taken.

As subsequent film production histories showed, none of the subsequent film directors and producers ever bothered to consult with Roddenberry in person or in writing again, his formal "Created by" and "Executive Consultant" credits for them notwithstanding. Star Trek Movie Memories , pp. This fate already befell Roddenberry while The Motion Picture was still in production, and the film turned out to be his second and last major theatrical motion picture production.

Implicating Roddenberry in the high production costs, which was only partly justified see below , was, in hindsight, indeed studio politics by COO Michael Eisner and his studio executive colleagues, adeptly turning a disadvantage into a publicity advantage by carefully managing cost information dissemination. Usually, corporations, regardless in what industry they are operating, are loathe to divulge costs, especially if a product is not doing well, but in this case aggregates were made public around the time the film premiered, already allowing reporter Peter H.

Reader magazine, 23 November , p. Roddenberry was indeed largely responsible for the script problems, which did cause production delays and thus over-budget expenditures, but the visual effects debacle situation see below was somewhat more nuanced. During the production of The Motion Picture , it was Director Wise, who had grown weary of the constant script delays, who skillfully maneuvered Roddenberry out of creative control in October David Gerrold, reaffirming that the studio still blamed Roddenberry for the perceived The Motion Picture failure, stated when he was pulled from the series, " Gene didn't like Rick, at all.

But Rick was installed on the show by the studio as a way to keep a control on the show Ultimately, Berman ended up in control rather than Maizlish [note: Roddenberry's lawyer, who tried to establish creative control of the new show for his client] because Berman played the politics of the studio more effectively.

Yet, not everyone bought into the studio line, as Roddenberry had never been without staunch supporters of his own, like the author couple Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens , who have bluntly stated in their reference book The Art of Star Trek p. Concurrently, Director Robert Wise too, bore some of the responsibilities of the high production costs, after he was brought aboard in March and was given near- carte blanche latitude by the studio.

As was his habit for all the films he worked on, Wise stipulated on that occasion that he was to have executive producer rights as well, which the studio granted, in the process curtailing those of Roddenberry. Wise's management style as producer did also backfire in regard to the visual effects, and it was Roddenberry, of all people, who sounded the alarm when the situation started to spin out of control see below. But Wise was never associated by the studio with the high production costs, as he was, consciously or not, and unlike every other of his films, never officially credited as producer and therefore shielded from criticism.

It should likewise be noted that Wise in his role as director also should have shared to some extent in the "plodding pace" criticism but, in his defense, in this regard he had by then little choice due to the February visual effects debacle, as he was forced to " start putting our effects into the body of film, one at a time, as they came in from the effects houses ". While the studio has successfully deflected any performance responsibility for the film from itself, there actually was enough blame to go around for them as well, already starting with the upgrade decision proper of 11 November Business economics generally states that a radical mid-stream course change for any product or project development, especially for one as advanced in development as Phase II was, is bad management decision making.

If overriding reasons does make it imperative, huge transition costs, even if carefully managed, are by definition unavoidable. When Robert Wise was approached for the director's position, he recalled, " And when I first came into the film, I was told by Michael and Jeffrey [Katzenberg] that they were out to make a "top-notch picture", and that our budget stood at somewhere between fifteen and eighteen million dollars.

They didn't exactly expect we'd be able to actually spend that much They've always thought that about the TV people. We did something, sort of down here and they did things that were sort of up there, that we could not do up here, what they did down there, whatever!

While studio executives are dependent on their producers for providing accurate production information — studio executives are generally business people, not film or television makers, and they usually have more than one production under their auspices at any given time — this does not discharge them from the responsibility of performing their own due diligence assessments, especially on financial matters, which are their primary responsibility in the first place.

So, to this day I'd love to know who has made the decision at Paramount to come to us, and say, "We want you to do the effects on this film. As an industry professional, Michael Eisner was aware of what the production budgets had been for the two most visually influential science fiction films in the previous ten years, he had in mind for his "top-notch picture", A Space Odyssey , and as indicated at the time by Production Illustrator Andrew Probert , who had stated, " Originally, when Bob Abel was on the project, everybody was extremely hopeful that this would surpass the classic Return to Tomorrow , p.

That includes all the versions they didn't do, the small feature, the TV series, the TV movie and all of that. DeMille's inflation adjusted remake of his own silent film classic The Ten Commandments , being the sole exception. Only in the mid-to-late s did production budgets start habitually to balloon exponentially, first in double digits, and subsequently into the triple digits. In the case of Star Wars , Eisner and company, formed in the "Hollywood Studio System" tradition, failed to grasp that that film was produced under unique and radically different circumstances.

Firstly, George Lucas employed an, at the time, virtually unknown and therefore inexpensive, cast the only two established names, Peter Cushing and Alec Guinness, agreed to perform in the film for token fees ; Secondly, Lucas combined within himself the roles of director, producer, as well as story and script development, affording him to maintain production integrity, and ensuring that the production stayed strictly on course creatively.

In the case of the Motion Picture these roles were divided over a half dozen people, each of which with his own agenda, resulting in the somewhat unstructured and drifting production history and constituting a classic case of having too many helmsmen at the wheel; thirdly, and most importantly, cost-wise speaking, all effects were produced in-house.

Thus organized, Lucas was ensured of minimal meddling by the powerful Hollywood Unions. And the only person who seems to know how to do it right now, forgive me, is George Lucas, because I firmly believe Steven Spielberg hasn't the slightest idea what storytelling is all about.

He's proved that rather conclusively. Paramount Pictures could never enjoy these advantages, if only for the fact that they, as a venerable and well-established motion picture industry corporation, were subjected to more stifling Hollywood Union regulation. The circumstance that two Paramount subsidiary companies, the visual effects companies Magicam, Inc. Corporate laws in those territories employing the free market economy system, universally have it that the subsidiary structure of a corporation, if utilized, may not lead to unfair competition advantages in regard to companies not encompassed within a group.

This translates in practice that these subsidiaries can not give parent or sister companies undue advantages by offering them services or products at below- cost, and are to be treated as independent, outside companies with their own profitability responsibilities.

Considered paramount, it is one of the most strictly enforced corporate laws in the Western world, the US, EU, and Australia in particular, where authorities are singularly keen on meeting any perceived transgression with traditionally hefty fines. It was exactly this circumstance Magicam's Vice-President Carey Melcher referred to, when he made the statement on the occasion of his company being reinstated as the primary studio model vendor for the Motion Picture in January , " Even though we were a Paramount company, we had to submit bids just like any outsiders.

We were expensive, because we're a [n] union shop, but they knew we could do the work. However, for Paramount Pictures proper, the profits made by Magicam and FGC did turn up on their individual profit-and-loss statement as production costs. While Paramount had done nothing untoward legally, it would have in hindsight behooved them, if they had taken these inter-company profits into account when acquiescing the publication of the aggregate production costs, allowing for a more honest assessment of the performance of The Motion Picture.

As it turned out, the "inter-company" situation only played a part of any substance in the case of the Motion Picture , as it was not applicable in any of the later Star Trek film productions. For Paramount proper it again resulted in very similar adverse circumstances for the profitability performances of their three, , alternate reality films. The cost-inefficient situation of having "too many helmsmen at the wheel" was not restricted to the highest management echelons alone. It started out to be a horse, but a committee got hold of it.

Everyone got into the act on that movie. There was creative pulling back and forth, fumbling around, coming and going of people ad infinitum and ad nauseam. Everyone who worked on the art direction provided too much input to be ignored, so we all got credit, and Hal Michelson , brought in as art director, ended up getting credit as production designer. The trouble, as always, was that the wrong people were in charge. We're in a business in which the people at the top, who make the decisions, really don't know a damn thing about making pictures.

I think we all knew then that we were associated with a bomb. It's too bad the movie happened at all. Yet, if anything, studio executives exhibited the ability to learn, and this particular situation was avoided for later film productions where either a single art department was employed, or when multiple ones were, responsibility boundaries were strictly defined with all of them answering to a single studio appointed production designer.

As the previous points already implied, none of the studio executives, Michael Eisner especially, seemed to have a firm grasp of the products of the industry they were actually working for at the time, at least where visual effects heavy projects, which The Motion Picture as the very first one for Paramount actually was, were concerned. In the visual effects case, this was exemplified by Eisner's treatment of FGC and his later reaction to the visual effects situation in July Only in did Diller concede this to have actually been the case, " We didn't know what these things were, Bob Wise was a lovely man, but he didn't know, either.

Poor planning. From the beginning, we all said there was never any one in control. The people running all the studios in Hollywood are cost accountants, bankers and idiot sons of advertising executives from New York. They have no idea whatsoever — underline that in italics [sic.

To make room for parking on the Paramount lot, one of these executives had the western lot torn up — the last surving western lot in town. My question, and the question of most art department directors, to these individuals would be, "OK, what happens when Star Trek , Star Wars and the other pictures have had their run and you're back to making westerns? Where are you going to do them? You're going to have to build it again. They always come back. This too has to be taken with a grain of salt, as that film made use of many visual, and special effects elements — both commonly responsible for the largest part of a science fiction production budget, as it already had been for the Original Series — previously produced for the Motion Picture , the studio models, props and sets in particular and even including the reuse of entire visual effects sequences, thereby realizing huge savings in effects costs not incurred, known in business economics as "opportunity costs".

Common GAAP's have it elsewhere in the corporate world, that these costs should have been charged in proportion against this film and in the same proportion deducted after-the-fact from the Motion Picture — or put more simply, amortized over both productions. As stated above, the studio actually did charge in full all costs made for every single prior revitalization attempt to the Motion Picture , further hinting at information manipulation, an industry phenomenon known as " Hollywood accounting ".

And even in absolute dollars, the film still ranked fourth as of The most remarkable coda to the whole Motion Picture cost-price "controversy" was provided by the aforementioned obscure production, or investment company Century Associates who actually fronted Paramount Pictures the funding for The Motion Picture , when their official figures were submitted to the film website IMDb decades later.

For a more detailed breakdown of the individual performances in the film franchise, please see Star Trek films. Though Roddenberry was later implicated in the high visual effects over-budget expenditures, Michael Eisner and his studio CEO colleagues could actually be as equally faulted as well, as they, prior to the Phase II project, seriously mishandled the relationship with Paramount's subsidiary effects house, FGC led by Douglas Trumbull , as Trumbull years later bitterly recalled the studio of course, did not share that information with the public at the time , " Paramount had no vision at all and [was] going through a big management change.

The guy [remark: Frank Yablans] that I did the deal with was ousted, and Michael Eisner and Barry Diller came in and they couldn't see what I was trying to do and wanted to get rid of it. I don't know, there's just a whole train of disillusionment that accompanies my history in movies. Trumbull, one of the effects supervisors for A Space Odyssey , whose grandeur the studio wanted to emulate for the upgraded film, was actually the first party approached for the film's visual effects, but he had to decline as he and his company were knee-deep involved in the post-production of the science fiction classic Close Encounters of the Third Kind at the time.

Cinefex , issue 1, pp. As it turned out, both parties were to pay the price for their failure to communicate and Paramount was forced to come yet knocking on Trumbull's door later on during the production, hat in hand. One can only wonder if a little more diplomacy on part of both sides could have prevented the ensuing visual effects debacle.

At the time, the studio falsely spun Trumbull's refusal in contemporary press releases as being, "regrettably", unable to meet Trumbull's demand of serving on the film as its director though having dangled, insincerely however, as they never had for a second considered doing so, the position as a carrot in front of him — like Roddenberry, Trumbull had a "solid" reputation of being too difficult to work with , instead of Wise. Return to Tomorrow , pp. New West magazine, 26 March , p.

In Rabwin's defense, many studios were at the time interested in doing science fiction, and he had a hard time finding an available effects studio at all. Star Trek Movie Memories , p. The cat came out of the bag in February when it became known that Robert Abel was actually aware that he could not do the effects for his initial bid. The shortfall was almost exactly the amount he requested as the first two budget upgrades in the early stages of his company's involvement.

New West magazine, 26 March , pp. However, this entailed discarding all the ones made for Phase II , deemed unsuitable to meet big-screen requirements, and starting all over again. Star Trek: Creating the Enterprise , 1st ed, p. Apparently, Wise saw no need for one at the time, as he had none on the two science fiction films he worked on before, The Day the Earth Stood Still and The Andromeda Strain , and on whose strengths he was hired in the first place , instead dealing directly with the effects staffers in his role as producer.

On both films he was well served by conscientious effects staffers, especially on the latter one where it was Douglas Trumbull himself who directed the effects and with whom Wise formed a close relationship on that occasion. Roddenberry, drawing upon the very good experience he had on the Original Series with Edward K. Eisner immediately responded by appointing Richard Yuricich to the production and concurrently instructing studio executives Jeffrey Katzenberg and Lindsley Parsons, Jr.

However, in doing so, Eisner exhibited his lack of understanding and empathy as both Katzenberg and Parsons were at the time business managers not yet a film maker in the former case , and neither had any experience with visual effects whatsoever, whereas, intentionally or not, forcing Yuricich to serve as an unpaid liaison due to contractual obligations, was a particularly uncouth act on the part of Eisner, as an unmotivated Yuricich was co-founder and co-CEO of the by Eisner maligned FGC.

Roddenberry, who suggested him, was not aware of the problems between FGC and the studio, and unsurprisingly, Eisner's actions did not do much to remedy the situation. Spock's Arrival [] Meet V'Ger [] The Cloud [] V'Ger Flyover [] The Force Field [] Micro Exam [] System Inoperative [] Hidden Information [] V'Ger Speaks [] 2.

The Enterprise [Early Version] [] 5. Leaving Drydock [Early Version] [] 6. No Goodbyes [Early Version] [] 7. Spock's Arrival [Early Version] [] 8. Micro Exam [Early Version] [] 9. Games [Early Version] [] Leaving Drydock [] The Enterprise [] Ilia's Theme [] Vejur Flyover [] The Meld [] Spock Walk [] End Title [] CD3: Alternates: 1. Overture [Long Version] [] 2.

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Like the Klingon ships earlier, Epsilon IX is destroyed. Ordering Uhura to deactivate the viewer, Kirk informs the crew that the pre-launch countdown will begin in forty minutes and the assembled crew leaves to attend to their duties. Later on the bridge, Uhura informs Kirk that the transporter has been fully repaired and is functioning properly now.

Lieutenant Ilia , the Enterprise 's Deltan navigator , arrives. Decker is happy to see her, as they developed a romantic relationship when he was assigned to her home planet several years earlier. Ilia is curious about Decker's reduction in rank and Kirk interrupts and tells her about Decker being the executive and science officer. Decker tells her, with slight sarcasm, that Captain Kirk has the utmost confidence in him. Ilia tells Kirk that her oath of celibacy is on record and asks permission to assume her duties.

Uhura tells Kirk that one of the last six crew members to arrive is refusing to beam up. Kirk goes to the transporter room to ensure that the person is beamed up. When told by a yeoman that the crew member insisted on them beaming up first, " said something about first "seeing how it scrambled our molecules ," " Kirk tells Starfleet to beam the officer aboard.

McCoy , dressed in civilian attire and wearing a thick beard , materializes on the transporter platform. McCoy is angry that his Starfleet commission was reactivated. He realizes that Kirk is responsible for the draft. His attitude changes, however, when Kirk says he desperately needs him. McCoy leaves to check out the new sickbay , grumbling about all the new changes to the Enterprise. The crew finishes its repairs and the Enterprise leaves drydock and heads into the solar system at impulse.

A clean-shaven Dr. McCoy arrives on the bridge and complains that the new sickbay is now nothing but a " damned computer center. Suddenly, the Enterprise enters a wormhole , which was created by an engine imbalance, and is about to collide with an asteroid that has been pulled inside. Kirk orders the Enterprise 's phasers to be fired on it, but Decker tells Chekov to fire photon torpedoes instead.

With just four seconds to spare before the Enterprise is obliterated, the asteroid and the wormhole are destroyed. Annoyed, Kirk wants to meet with Decker in his quarters. McCoy decides to come along. Once in Kirk's quarters, Kirk demands an explanation from Decker on why his phaser order was countermanded.

Decker pointed out that the redesigned Enterprise now channels the phasers through the main engines and because they were imbalanced, the phasers were automatically cut off. Kirk acknowledged that he had saved the ship — however, he accuses Decker of competing with him. Decker, in his opinion, tells Kirk that, because of his unfamiliarity with the ship's new design, the mission is in serious jeopardy.

Kirk sarcastically trusts that Decker will " nursemaid me through these difficulties, " and Decker tells the captain that he will gladly help him understand the new design. Kirk then dismisses him from the room. In the corridor, Decker runs into Ilia. Ilia asked if the confrontation was difficult, and he tells her that it was about as difficult as seeing her again, and apologizes. She asked if he was sorry for leaving Delta IV , or for not saying goodbye. He said that if he had seen her again, would she be able to say goodbye?

She quietly says " no ," and goes to her quarters nearby. Back in Kirk's quarters, McCoy accuses Kirk of being the one who was competing, and the fact that it was Kirk who used the emergency to pressure Starfleet into letting him get command of the Enterprise. McCoy thinks that Kirk is obsessed with keeping his command. On Kirk's console viewscreen , Uhura informs Kirk that a Starfleet registered shuttlecraft is approaching and that the occupant wishes to dock.

Chekov also pipes in and replies that it appears to be a courier vessel, non-belligerency confirmed. Kirk tells Chekov to handle the situation. Turning the viewer off, Kirk asks McCoy is he has anything more to add, to which McCoy quietly states " that depends on you, " and leaves Kirk to ponder this, while he stands silently. The shuttle approaches the Enterprise from behind, and the top portion of it detaches and docks at an airlock just behind the bridge.

Chekov is waiting by the airlock doors with a security officer and is surprised to see Spock come aboard. Moments later, Spock arrives on the bridge, and everyone is shocked and pleased to see him, yet Spock ignores them. He moves over to the science station and tells Kirk that he is aware of the crisis and knows about the ship's engine design difficulties. He offers his services as the science officer. McCoy and Dr. Christine Chapel come to the bridge to greet Spock, but he only looks at them coldly and does not reply to them.

Uhura tries to speak to Spock, but he ignores her as well and tells Kirk that with his permission, he will go to engineering and discuss his fuel equations with Scott. As Spock walks into the turbolift , Kirk stops him and welcomes him aboard.

But Spock makes no reply and continues into the turbolift. Kirk and McCoy both share a look after Spock leaves the bridge. With Spock's assistance, the engines are now rebalanced for full warp capacity. The ship successfully goes to warp to intercept the cloud. In the officers lounge, Spock meets with Kirk and McCoy. They discuss Spock's kolinahr training on Vulcan, and how Spock broke off from his training to join them.

Spock describes how he sensed the consciousness of the intruder, from a source more powerful that he has ever encountered, with perfect, logical thought patterns. He believes that it holds the answers he seeks. Uhura tells Kirk over the intercom that they have made visual contact with the intruder. The cloud scans the ship, but Kirk orders no return scans.

Spock determines that the scans are coming from the center of the cloud. Uhura reports that she's transmitting full friendship messages on all frequencies, but there is no response. Decker suggests raising the shields for protection, but Kirk determines that that might be considered hostile to the cloud. Spock analyzes the clouds composition and discovers it has a power energy field, the equivalent of power generated by thousands of starships. Sitting at the science station, Spock awakens from a brief trance.

He reveals to Kirk that the alien was communicating with him. The alien is puzzled — it contacted the Enterprise — why has the Enterprise not replied? Before they can think further, a red alert sounds, and a plasma bolt beam from within the cloud hits the ship and begins to overload the ship's systems. Bolts of lightning surround the warp core and nearly injure some engineering officers, but Chekov was hurt — his hand is badly burned while he was sitting at the weapons station on the bridge.

The bolt then finally disappears, and Scott reports deflector power is down seventy percent. A medical team is called to the bridge, and Ilia is able to use her telepathic powers to soothe Chekov's pain. Spock confirms to Kirk that the alien has been attempting to communicate. It transmits at a frequency of more than one million megahertz, and at such a high rate of speed, the message only lasts a millisecond.

Spock programs to computer to send linguacode messages at that frequency and rate of speed. Another energy beam is sent out, but Spock transmits a message just in time, and the beam disappears. Kirk asks for recommendations, and Spock recommends proceeding inside the cloud to investigate, while Decker advises against it, calling the move an "unwarranted gamble. Kirk orders that the ship continue on course through the cloud. They pass through many expansive and colorful cloud layers and upon clearing these, a giant vessel is revealed.

Kirk asks for an evaluation and Spock reports that the vessel is generating a force field greater than the radiation of Earth's sun. Kirk tells Uhura to transmit an image of the alien to Starfleet, but she explains that any transmission sent out of the cloud is being reflected back to them. Kirk orders Sulu to fly above and along the top of the vessel at a distance of only five hundred meters. As Enterprise moves in front of the alien vessel and holds position, an alarm sounds, and yet another energy bolt approaches the ship.

The crew struggles to shield their eyes from its brilliant glow and their ears from the high-pitched shrieking buzz it lets out. Chekov asks Spock if it is one of the alien's crew, and Spock replies that it is a probe sent from the vessel.

The probe slowly moves around the room and stops in front of the science station. Bolts of lightning shoot out from it and surround the console — it is trying to access the ship's computer. Spock manages to smash the controls to prevent further access, and the probe gives him an electric shock that sends him rolling onto the floor. The probe approaches the navigation console and it scans Ilia. Suddenly, she vanishes, along with the probe, and the tricorder she was holding falls to the floor.

Decker retrieves the tricorder and angrily exclaims, "This is how I define unwarranted! Another alert goes off, reporting helm control has been lost. Spock reports they've been caught by a tractor beam and Kirk orders someone up to take the navigator's station.

Decker calls for Chief DiFalco to come up to the bridge as Ilia's replacement. Decker suggests that the ship fires phasers, but Spock, evocatively, asserts that "Any show of resistance would be futile, Captain. Decker wonders why they were brought inside — they could have been easily destroyed outside. Spock deduces that the alien is curious about them. Uhura's monitor shows that the aperture is closing — they are now trapped inside. The ship is released from the tractor beam and suddenly, an intruder alert goes off.

Someone has come aboard the ship and is in the crew quarters section. Kirk and Spock arrive inside a crewman's quarters to discover that the intruder is inside the sonic shower. It is revealed to be Ilia, although it isn't really her — there is a small red device attached to her neck. In a mechanized voice, she replies, " You are the Kirk unit, you will assist me. Kirk opens the shower door and " Ilia " steps out, wearing a small white garment that just materialized around her.

Kirk asks her who V'ger is. She replies, " V'ger is that which programmed me. Kirk asks where the real Ilia is, and the probe states that "that unit" no longer functions. Kirk also asks why V'ger is traveling to Earth, and the probe answers that it wishes to find the Creator, join with him, and become one with it. Spock suggests that McCoy perform a complete examination of the probe. In sickbay, the Ilia probe lays on a diagnostic table, its sensors slowly taking readings.

All normal body functions, down to the microscopic level, are exactly duplicated by the probe, even eye moisture. Decker arrives and is stunned to see her there. She looks up at him and addresses him as " Decker ", rather than " Decker unit ," which intrigues Spock. Spock talks with Kirk and Decker in an adjoining room and Spock locks the door. Spock theorizes that the real Ilia's memories and feelings have been duplicated by the probe as well as her body. Decker is angry that the probe killed Ilia, but Kirk convinces him that their only contact with the vessel is through the probe, and they need to use that advantage to find out more about the alien.

Suddenly, the probe bursts through the door, and demands that Kirk assist her with her observations. He tells her that Decker will do it with more efficiency. After Decker and the probe leave, Spock expresses concern to Kirk of that being their only source of information.

Decker and Ilia are seen walking around in the recreation room. He shows her pictures of previous ships that were named Enterprise. Decker has been trying to see if Ilia's memories or emotions can resurface, but to no avail. Kirk and McCoy are observing them covertly on a monitor from his quarters. Decker shows her a game that the crew enjoys playing. She is not interested and states that recreation and enjoyment have no meaning to her programming.

At another game, which Ilia enjoyed and nearly always won, they both press one of their hands down onto a table to play it. The table lights up, indicating she won the game, and she gazes into Decker's eyes. This moment of emotion ends suddenly, and she returns to normal. Decker tells her the ship couldn't function without them.

She tells him that more information is needed before the crew can be patterned for data storage. Horrified, he asks her what this means. He convinces her to let him help her revive those patterns so that she can understand their functions better. She allows him to proceed. Meanwhile, in one of the ship's airlocks , Spock slips up behind the airlock technician and nerve pinches him into unconsciousness.

Decker, the probe, Dr. McCoy, and Dr. Chapel are in Ilia's quarters. Chapel gives the probe a decorative headband that Ilia used to wear. Chapel puts it over "Ilia's" head and turns her toward a mirror. Decker asks her if she remembers wearing it on Delta IV. The probe shows another moment of emotion, saying Dr. Chapel's name, and putting her hand on Decker's face, calling him Will.

Behind them, McCoy reminds Decker that she is a mechanism. Decker asks "Ilia" to help them make contact with V'ger. She says that she can't, and Decker asks her who the Creator is. She says V'ger does not know. The probe becomes emotionless again and removes the headband. Spock is now outside the ship in a space suit with an emergency evacuation thruster pack.

He begins recording a log entry for Kirk detailing his attempt to contact the alien. He activates a panel on the suit and calculates thruster ignition and acceleration to coincide with the opening of an aperture ahead of him. He hopes to get a better view of the spacecraft interior. Damn him! Kirk comes up to the bridge and Uhura tells him that Starfleet signals are growing stronger, indicating they are very close to Earth. Starfleet is monitoring the intruder and notifies Uhura that it is slowing down in its approach.

Sulu confirms this and says that lunar beacons show the intruder is entering into Earth orbit. Chekov tells Kirk that airlock 4 has been opened and a thruster suit has been reported missing. Kirk figures out that Spock has done it, and orders Chekov to get Spock back on the ship. He changes his mind, and instead tells Chekov to determine his position. Spock touches a button on his thruster panel and his thruster engine ignites. He is propelled forward rapidly, and enters the next chamber of the vessel just before the aperture closes behind him.

The thruster engine shuts down, and the momentum carries Spock ahead further. He disconnects the thruster pack from his suit and it falls away from him. Continuing his log entry, Spock sees an image of what he believes to be V'ger 's homeworld. He passes through a tunnel filled with crackling plasma energy, possibly a power source intended for a gigantic imaging system. Next, he sees several more images of planets , moons , stars , and galaxies all stored and recorded.

Spock theorizes that this may be a visual representation of V'ger 's entire journey. He sees the Epsilon IX station, stored in every detail, and notes to Kirk that he is convinced that all of what he is seeing is V'ger , and that they are inside a living machine. Then he sees a giant image of Lt. Ilia with the sensor on her neck.

Spock decides it must have some special meaning, so he attempts to mind meld with it. He is quickly overwhelmed by the multitude of images flooding his mind and falls back unconscious. Kirk is now in a space suit and has exited the ship. The aperture in front of the Enterprise opens, and Spock's unconscious body floats toward him. Later, Dr. Chapel and Dr. McCoy are examining Spock in sickbay. McCoy performs scans and determines that Spock endured massive neurological trauma from the mind meld.

While he is telling Kirk this, they are interrupted by an incredible sound: Spock, regaining consciousness, is laughing softly, saying he should have known. Spock describes V'ger as a sentient being, from a planet populated by living machines with unbelievable technology, allowing it access to a truly galactic store of knowledge.

Yet for all that, V'ger is barren, with no sense of mystery and no emotions to give meaning to its actions. Spock, seeing the irony when comparing V'Ger to himself, could not help but laugh: V'Ger has, for all intents and purposes, achieved Kolinahr — flawless logic and limitless knowledge — yet doing so has only made it see the gaps in its own understanding.

Spock grasps Kirk's hand and tells him, "This simple feeling is beyond V'ger 's comprehension. No meaning, no hope. And Jim, no answers. It's asking questions. Is there nothing more? Uhura chimes in and tells Kirk that they are getting a faint signal from Starfleet. The intruder has been on their monitors for a while and the cloud is rapidly dissipating as it approaches.

Sulu also comments that the intruder has slowed to sub-warp speed and is only three minutes from Earth orbit. Kirk acknowledges and he, McCoy, and Spock go up to the bridge. Starfleet sends the Enterprise a tactical report on the intruders position. Uhura tells Kirk that V'ger is transmitting a signal.

Decker and "Ilia" come up to the bridge, and she says that V'ger is signaling the Creator. Spock determines that the transmission is a radio signal. Decker tells Kirk that V'ger expects an answer, but Kirk doesn't know the question. Then "Ilia" says that the Creator has not responded.

An energy bolt is released from V'ger and positions itself above Earth. Chekov reports that all planetary defense systems have just gone inoperative. Several more bolts are released, and they all split apart to form smaller ones and they assume equidistant positions around the planet. McCoy notices that the bolts are the same ones that hit the ship earlier, and Spock says that these are hundreds of times more powerful, and from those positions, they can destroy all life on Earth.

Kirk tells "Ilia" that carbon units are a natural function of the Creator's planet and they are living things, not infestations. However "Ilia" says they are not true lifeforms like the Creator. McCoy realizes V'ger must think its creator is a machine. Decker concurs, comparing it to "We all create God in our own image. Spock compares V'ger to a child and suggests they treat it like one. McCoy retorts that this child is about to wipe out every living thing on Earth.

To get "Ilia's" attention, Kirk says that the carbon units know why the Creator hasn't responded. The Ilia probe demands that Kirk " disclose the information. In response to this, V'ger cuts off the ship's communications with Starfleet. She tells him again to disclose the information.

He refuses, and a plasma energy attack shakes the ship. McCoy tells Spock that the child is having a " tantrum. Kirk tells the probe that if V'ger destroys the Enterprise , then the information it needs will also be destroyed with it. Ilia says that it is illogical to withhold the required information, and asks him why he won't disclose it. Kirk explains it is because V'ger is going to destroy all life on Earth. V'ger needs the information, says "Ilia.

Spock tells Kirk that V'ger must have a central brain complex. Kirk theorizes that the orbiting devices are controlled from there. Kirk tells "Ilia" that the information can't be disclosed to V'ger 's probe, but only to V'ger itself. Chekov tells Kirk that the energy bolts will reach their final positions and activate in 27 minutes.

Kirk calls to Scott on the intercom and tells him to stand by to execute Starfleet Order — the self-destruct command. A female crewmember, Ross , asks Scott why Kirk ordered self-destruct, and Scott tells her that Kirk hopes that when they explode, so will the intruder. The countdown is now down to 18 minutes. DiFalco reports that they have traveled 17 kilometers inside the vessel. Kirk goes over to Spock's station and sees that Spock has been crying.

Spock tells him he is crying for V'ger , and that he weeps for V'ger as he would for a brother. As he was when he came aboard the Enterprise , so is V'ger now — empty, incomplete, and searching. Logic and knowledge are not enough. McCoy realizes Spock has found what he needed, but that V'ger hasn't. Decker wonders what V'ger would need to fulfill itself. Spock comments that each one of us, at some point in our lives asks, " Why am I here? DiFalco directs Kirk's attention to the viewscreen.

Ahead of them is a structure with a bright light. Sulu reports that forward motion has stopped. Uhura has located the source of the radio signal and it is straight ahead. The landing party exits an airlock on the top of the saucer section and walks up the passageway. At the end of the path is a concave structure, and in the center of it is an old NASA probe from three centuries earlier.

Kirk tries to rub away the smudges on the nameplate and makes out the letters "V G E R". He continues to rub and discovers that the craft is actually Voyager 6. Kirk recalls the history of the Voyager program — it was designed to collect data and transmit it back to Earth. Decker tells Kirk that Voyager 6 disappeared through a then-called black hole. Kirk says that it must have emerged on the far side of the galaxy and got caught in the machine planet's gravity.

Spock theorizes that the planet's inhabitants found the probe to be one of their own kind — primitive, yet kindred. They discovered the probe's 20th century programming, which was to collect data and return that information to its creator. The machines interpreted that instruction literally and constructed the entire vessel so that Voyager could fulfill its programming. Kirk continues by saying that on its journey back, it amassed so much knowledge that it gained its own consciousness.

Kirk calls Uhura on his communicator and tells her to find information on the probe in the ship's computer , specifically the NASA code signal, which will allow the probe to transmit its data. Decker realizes that that is what the probe was signaling — it's ready to transmit everything.

Kirk then says that there is no one on Earth who recognizes the old-style signal — the Creator does not answer. Kirk calls out to V'ger and says that they are the Creator. Kirk says they will prove it by allowing V'ger to complete its programming.

Uhura calls Kirk on his communicator and tells him she has retrieved the code. Kirk tells her to set the Enterprise transmitter to the appropriate code frequency and to transmit the signal. Decker reads the numerical code on his tricorder and is about to read the final sequence, but V'ger burns out its own antenna leads to prevent reception. McCoy warns Kirk that they only have ten minutes left. Decker figures out that V'ger wanted to bring the Creator here and transmit the code in person. Spock tells Kirk that V'ger 's knowledge has reached the limits of the universe and it must evolve.

Kirk says that V'ger needs a Human quality in order to evolve. Decker thinks that V'ger joining with the Creator will accomplish that. He then goes over to the damaged circuitry and fixes the wires so he can manually enter the rest of the code through the ground test computer.

Kirk tries to stop him, but "Ilia" tosses him aside. Decker tells Kirk that he wants this as much as Kirk wanted the Enterprise. Suddenly, a bright light forms around Decker's body. Their bodies disappear, and the light expands and begins to consume the area. Kirk, Spock, and McCoy retreat back to the Enterprise. V'ger explodes, leaving the Enterprise above Earth, unharmed. On the bridge, Kirk wonders if they just saw the beginning of a new lifeform , and Spock says yes and that it is possibly the next step in their evolution.

McCoy says that it's been a while since he "delivered" a baby and hopes that they got this one off to a good start. We witnessed a birth. Uhura tells Kirk that Starfleet is requesting the ship's damage and injury reports and vessel status. Kirk reports that there were only two casualties: Lieutenant Ilia and Captain Decker.

He quickly corrects his statement and changes their status to "missing. Scott comes on the bridge and agrees with Kirk that it's time to give the Enterprise a proper shakedown. When Scott offers to have Spock back on Vulcan in four days, Spock says that's unnecessary, as his task on Vulcan is completed.

Kirk tells Sulu to proceed ahead at warp factor one. When DiFalco asks for a heading, Kirk simply says " Out there, that-away. With that, the Enterprise flies overhead and engages warp drive on its way to another mission of exploration and discovery. How in the name of hell do they expect me to have her ready in twelve hours?! Scott, an alien object of unbelievable destructive power is less than three days away from this planet.

The only starship in interception range is the Enterprise. Ready or not, she launches in twelve hours. He's been with the ship every minute of her refitting. You'll stay on as executive officer, temporary grade reduction to commander. Five years out there, dealing with unknowns like this.

My familiarity with the Enterprise , this crew. You don't know her a tenth as well as I do. I'm sorry, Will. I don't think you're sorry. Not one damn bit. I remember when you recommended me for this command. You told me how envious you were, and how you hoped you'd be given a starship command again. Well, sir, it looks like you found a way. I'll explain what happened. Your revered Admiral Nogura invoked a little known, seldom used reserve activation clause!

In simpler language, captain, they drafted me! Well, I'm gonna need a top nurse, not a doctor who'll argue every little diagnosis with me! And they've probably redesigned the whole sickbay, too! I know engineers. They love to change things! It's like working in a damn computer center! Chekov, there are casualties. My wits! As in, frightened out of, captain, sir! You're just as warm and sociable as ever.

It doesn't seem interested in us. Only the ship. Earth's defenses! Starfleet's strength! I want him to lead me to whatever is out there. Now what do you suggest we do? Spank it? As I was when I came aboard, so is V'ger now. What was I meant to be? V'ger hopes to touch its creator to find its answers. V'ger 's liable to be in for one hell of a disappointment. Possibly a next step in our evolution. It is somewhat unclear as to what exact year the first Star Trek film took place.

In , StarTrek. This would establish the earliest point at which The Motion Picture could have possibly taken place some time in either or depending at what point in the ship ended the five-year mission. On the other end of the spectrum, the latest this film could have taken place is in , since the red The Wrath of Khan -style uniforms were in use by some time that year based on TNG : " Cause and Effect ". The stardates mentioned in the film cannot be used to accurately date the events, since the four-digit stardates beginning with the digit "7" were used for fifteen years between and , based on " Bem ", " The Ensigns of Command ", and Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.

Jim, this vessel was launched almost three hundred years ago ", and given that the Voyager 6 probe would naturally have been launched some time after Voyager 1 and 2 , which were launched in , then this would put a lower limit of on the year of the film's events. Apocryphally, the dating of the film has been set by Pocket Books to be in their chronology Voyages of Imagination.

The novel Triangle supports this dating, as it is set after The Motion Picture, and takes place seven years after " Amok Time ", in Also, the novelization of the film written by Gene Roddenberry states that it has been 2. Due to all this obscurity, however, Memory Alpha leaves the exact canonical dating open, and simply dates the film in the s.

This doesn't take inflation into account, however; taking it into account, Cleopatra was, at the time, the most expensive film ever made. This is a sound business generally accepted accounting principle as stated in any business economics text book and where the principles are known under their acronym GAAP's since it prevents cost price inflation with undue elements, therefore avoiding pollution of their viability assessment, of products that do come to fruition.

Still, in the particular case of Phase II , an argument could be made for carrying over production costs already incurred to the Motion Picture , since some of those costs were applicable to the Motion Picture as well, such as those of the sets that were already constructed and the fees for production staff and cast already paid, who continued to work on the film.

The crew built a circular track that had the same shape as the corridor and suspended the antigravity prop on four small wires that connected to the track. The wires were treated with a special acid that oxidized the metal; the reaction tarnished the wires to a dull gray that would not show up in the deep blue corridor lighting. Cargo boxes were made out of light balsa wood so that fine wires could be used as support.

Nimoy and Shatner ad-lib their lines in response to constant corrections; Koenig noted that "we're falling further behind in our shooting schedule, but we're having fun doing it. As August ended, production continued to slip farther behind schedule.

Koenig learned that rather than being released in 14 days after his scenes were completed, his last day would be on October 26—eight weeks later than expected. A piece of aluminum foil was placed around Koenig's arm, covered by a protective pad and then hidden by the uniform sleeve.

Weldon prepared an ammonia and acetic acid solution that was touched to Koenig's sleeve, causing it to smoke. Difficulties resulted in the scene being shot ten times; it was especially uncomfortable for the actor, whose arm was slightly burned when some of the solution leaked through to his arm. Khambatta also faced difficulties during filming. She refused to appear nude as called for in the script during the Ilia probe's appearance.

The producers got her to agree to wear a thin skin-colored body stocking, but she caught a cold as a result of the shower mist, created by dropping dry ice into warm water and funneling the vapors into the shower by a hidden tube. Khambatta had to leave the location repeatedly to avoid hypercapnia. The illuminated button in the hollow of the probe's throat was a volt light bulb that Khambatta could turn on and off via hidden wires; the bulb's heat eventually caused a slight burn.

On January 26, , the film finally wrapped after days. Shatner, Nimoy, and Kelley delivered their final lines at pm. Before the crew could go home, a final shot had to be filmed—the climactic fusing of Decker and V'Ger. The script prescribed a heavy emphasis on lighting, with spiraling and blinding white lights. Collins was covered in tiny dabs of cotton glued to his jacket; these highlights were designed to create a body halo. Helicopter lights, 4,watt lamps and wind machines were used to create the effect of Decker's fusion with the living machine.

The first attempts at filming the scene became a nightmare for the crew. The extreme lighting caused normally invisible dust particles in the air to be illuminated, creating the appearance that the actors were caught in a blizzard. During the retakes throughout the week the crew mopped and dusted the set constantly, and it required later technical work to eliminate the dust in the final print. Two weeks later, the entire cast and crew joined with studio executives for a traditional wrap party.

While much of the crew readied for post-production, Wise and Roddenberry were grateful for the opportunity to take a short vacation from the motion picture before returning to work. I wanted it to be this beautiful, epic, spectacular sequence that had no dialogue, no story, no plot, everything stops, and let the audience just love the Enterprise. I wanted everybody to buy into the beauty of space, and the beauty of their mission, and the beauty of the Enterprise itself, and just have everybody get out of their way and let that happen, which is something I really learned with Kubrick and : Stop talking for a while, and let it all flow.

Editor Todd Ramsay and assistants spent principal photography syncing film and audio tracks. The resulting rough cuts were used to formulate plans for sound effects, music, and optical effects that would be added later. Roddenberry also provided a large amount of input, sending memos to Ramsay via Wise with ideas for editing.

Ramsay tried to cut as much unnecessary footage as he could as long as the film's character and story development were not damaged. Because the original Vulcan scenes had been photographed with actors speaking English, the "language" needed to lip-sync with the actor's lines. After the groundbreaking opticals of Star Wars , The Motion Picture ' s producers realized the film required similarly high-quality visuals.

Trumbull was busy on Close Encounters , and was tired of being ignored as a director and having to churn out special effects for someone else's production; after completing the effects work, Trumbull planned on launching his own feature using a new film process. The next choice, John Dykstra , was similarly wrapped up in other projects. The scope and size of the effects grew after the television movie became The Motion Picture. Rumors surfaced about difficulties regarding the special effects. Effects artist Richard Yuricich acted as a liaison between Abel and Paramount.

To speed up the work, Abel passed off miniature and matte painting tasks to Yuricich. Despite being relieved of nearly half the effects work, it became clear by early that Abel and Associates would not be able to complete the remainder on time. Because of Trumbull's disinterest in only working on special effects, he reportedly received a six-figure salary and the chance to direct his own film.

Paramount fired Abel and Associates on February 22, Trumbull was confident that he could get the work done without a loss of quality despite a reputation for missing deadlines because of his perfectionism. Paramount assigned a studio executive to Trumbull to make sure he would meet the release date, [33] and together with Yuricich the effects team rushed to finish.

Trumbull recalled that Wise "trusted me implicitly" as a fellow director to complete the effects and "fix this for him". Time, not money, was the main issue; Trumbull had to deliver in nine months as many effects as in Star Wars or Close Encounters combined, which had taken years to complete. Trumbull and Dykstra found the Magicam models problematic. The Klingon cruiser's lighting was so dim that there was no way to make them bright enough on film.

As Trumbull also felt the Enterprise ' s lights were ill-suited for his needs, he rewired both models. He thought that Enterprise should self-illuminate when traveling years from any source of light. Instead of having the ship completely dark save for viewports, Trumbull devised a system of self-illumination; he pictured the ship as something like an oceanliner, "a grand lady of the seas at night". The Klingon cruiser sequence was developed to avoid an opening similar to Star Wars , with one model used for all three seen in the film.

While Dykstra's team handled the ships, the V'Ger cloud was developed by Trumbull. While the team planned on compositing multiple passes to provide physical movement to the cloud shots, Trumbull felt that it detracted from the sense of scale, and so small animations were subtly introduced in the final product. The same effect was recolored and used for the Klingons and the Enterprise ; the aliens' torpedoes glowed red while the "good guys" had blue-colored weaponry.

V'Ger's destruction of the ships was created using scanning lasers, with the multiple laser passes composited onto the moving model to create the final effect. Trumbull wanted the scene of Kirk and Scott approaching the Enterprise in drydock without dialogue to "let the audience just love the Enterprise ". Double shifts around the clock were required to finish the effect on time. Dykstra and Apogee created three models to stand in for the Epsilon 9 station.

A 6-by The station control tower was replicated with rear-projection screens to add the people inside. A 2 ft model spaceman created for the shot was used in the drydock sequence and Spock's spacewalk. Unique destruction effects for the station had to be discarded due to time constraints. V'Ger itself was filmed in a hazy, smoky room, in part to convey depth and also to hide the parts of the ship still under construction.

The multiple passes were largely based on guesswork, as every single available camera was in use and the effects had to be generated without the aid of a bluescreen. Even after the change in effects companies, Yuricich continued to provide many of the matte paintings used in the film, having previously worked on The Day the Earth Stood Still , Ben-Hur , North by Northwest and Logan's Run. The paintings were combined with live action after a selected area of the frame was matted out; the blue Earth sky over Yellowstone, for example was replaced with a red-hued Vulcan landscape.

More than such paintings were used. Trumbull said that Wise and the studio gave him "a tremendous amount of creative freedom" [31] despite being hired after the completion of nearly all the principal photography. The Spock spacewalk sequence, for example, was radically changed from the Abel version. The original plan was for Kirk to follow Spock in a spacesuit and come under attack from a mass of sensor-type organisms. Spock would save his friend, and the two would proceed through V'ger.

Wise, Kline, and Abel had been unable to agree on how to photograph the sequence, and the result was a poorly designed and ungainly effect that Trumbull was convinced was disruptive to the plot and would have cost millions to fix. Post-production was so late that Paramount obtained an entire MGM sound stage to store 3, large metal containers for each theater around the country.

Each final film reel was taken while wet from the film studio and put into a container with other reels, then taken to airplanes waiting on tarmacs. Wise, who had worked with the composer for The Sand Pebbles , replied "Hell, no. He's great! Goldsmith was influenced by the style of the romantic, sweeping music of Star Wars. It is, to me, like the Old West, we're up in the universe.

It's about discovery and new life [ Goldsmith's initial bombastic main theme reminded Ramsay and Wise of sailing ships. Unable to articulate what he felt was wrong with the piece, Wise recommended writing an entirely different piece. Although irked by the rejection, Goldsmith consented to rework his initial ideas. The approach of Kirk and Scott to the drydocked Enterprise by shuttle lasted a ponderous five minutes due to the effect shots coming in late and unedited, requiring Goldsmith to maintain interest with a revised and developed cue.

Much of the recording equipment used to create the movie's intricately complicated sound effects was, at the time, extremely cutting-edge. The movie provided major publicity and was used to advertise the synthesizer, though no price was given. Goldsmith heard it and immediately decided to use it for V'Ger's cues.

Goldsmith scored The Motion Picture over a period of three to four months, a relatively relaxed schedule compared to typical production, but time pressures resulted in Goldsmith bringing on colleagues to assist in the work. Alexander Courage , composer of the original Star Trek theme, provided arrangements to accompany Kirk's log entries, while Fred Steiner wrote 11 cues of additional music, notably the music to accompany the Enterprise achieving warp speed and first meeting V'Ger.

A soundtrack featuring the film's music was released by Columbia Records in together with the film debut, and was one of Goldsmith's best-selling scores. The album added an additional 21 minutes of music to supplement the original track list, and was resequenced to reflect the story line of the film.

The first disc features as much of the score as can fit onto a minute disc, while the second contains "Inside Star Trek", a spoken word documentary from the s. This 3-CD set contains the complete score for the first time, plus unreleased alternate and unused cues, in addition to the remastered original album. Sound designer Frank Serafine , a longtime Star Trek fan, was invited to create the sound effects for the picture.

Given access to state-of-the-art audio equipment, Serafine saw the picture as the chance to modernize outdated motion picture sound techniques with digital technology. Owing to background noise such as camera operation, much of the ambient noise or dialogue captured on set was unusable; it was Serafine's job to create or recreate sounds to mix back into the scenes. As all the sound elements such as dubbed lines or background noise came together, they were classified into three divisions: A Effects, B Effects, and C Effects.

A Effects were synthesized or acoustic sounds that were important and integral to the picture—the sound of V'Ger's weapon partly done with the blaster beam instrument for example, or Spock's mind meld, as well as transporters, explosions, and the warp speed sound effect. B Effects consisted of minor sounds such as the clicks of switches, beeps or chimes. C Effects were subliminal sounds that set moods—crowd chatter and ambient noise.

All the elements were mixed as "predubs" to speed integration into the final sound mix. When The Motion Picture was announced, many synthesizer artists submitted demo tapes to Paramount. Events such as Enterprise bridge viewscreen activation were kept silent to provide a more comfortable atmosphere. The wormhole's sucking sounds were created by slowing down and reversing old Paramount stock footage of a cowboy fight, while the warp acceleration "stretch" sound was built on a slowed-down cymbal crash.

According to Michele and Duncan Barrett , Roddenberry had a decidedly negative view of religion that was reflected in the Star Trek television series episodes; in the episode " Who Mourns for Adonais? In the television series, little time was spent pondering the fate of the dead. In The Motion Picture , meanwhile, Decker is apparently killed in merging with V'Ger, but Kirk wonders if they have seen the creation of a new life form. Decker and Ilia are listed as "missing" rather than dead, and the lighting and effects created as a result of the merge have been described as "quasimystical" and "pseudo-religious".

Persons notes that the result of individual pursuits of fulfillment are damaging or pyrrhic; meaning is only satisfactorily found through interpersonal relationships. To coincide with the film's release, Pocket Books published a novelization written by Roddenberry. The Vejur spelling for the "intruder's" name was used exclusively in the novel Roddenberry authored, from its first appearance on page of the first paperback edition of the novelization through to the account on the novel's page of Kirk reading the undamaged "V-G-E-R" letters on the fictional "Voyager 6" space probe's nameplate.

Owing to the rush to complete the film, The Motion Picture was never screened before test audiences, something Wise later regretted. Roddenberry, Wise, and the principal cast attended the function, which also served as an invitational benefit for the scholarship and youth education fund of the National Space Club. In , an extended cut premiered on the ABC television network. Two members of Wise's production company, David C. The production team used the original script, surviving sequence storyboards, memos, and the director's recollections.

In addition to cuts in some sequences, 90 new and redesigned computer-generated images were created. Aside from the effects, the soundtrack was remixed. Ambient noise such as the buzz of bridge controls were added to enhance certain scenes. Fein attributed the rating change to the more "intense" sound mix that made scenes such as the central part of V'Ger "more menacing".

The Director's Edition was far better received by critics than the original release, with some considering the edit to have subsequently turned the film into one of the series' best. The DVD Journal's Mark Bourne said it showcased "a brisker, more attractive version of the movie" that was "as good as it might have been in Even better maybe.

The film's original theatrical cut was released on Blu-ray Disc in May to coincide with the new Star Trek feature, [83] packaged with the five following features as the Star Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection. All six films in the set have 7. No mention was initially made of an Ultra HD Blu-ray release, nor was any mention made as to how Paramount has decided to resolve the problem of how to handle the revised CGI effects, long believed to be the main stumbling block to the film's availability on anything other than standard-definition media.

In the United States, the film sold the most tickets of any film in the franchise until Star Trek , and it remains the highest-grossing film of the franchise worldwide adjusted for inflation, [93] [94] but Paramount considered its gross disappointing compared to expectations and marketing. David Gerrold estimated before its release that the film would have to gross two to three times its budget to be profitable for Paramount.

The Motion Picture was met with mixed reviews from critics; [99] a retrospective for the BBC described the film as a critical failure. Schickel also lamented the lack of "boldly characterized" antagonists and battle scenes that made Star Wars fun; instead, viewers were presented with much talk, "much of it in impenetrable spaceflight jargon".

The scale of the television series arrested his vision at a comfortable and still interesting level, but the new film has finally removed the mask. The characters and acting received a mixed reception. Stephen Godfrey of The Globe and Mail rated their performances highly: "time has cemented Leonard Nimoy's look of inscrutability as Mr. Spock [ McCoy is as feisty as ever, and James Doohan as Scotty still splutters about his engineering woes.

At a basic level, their exchanges are those of an odd assortment of grumpy, middle-aged men bickering about office politics. They are a relief from the stars, and a delight. Many critics felt that the special effects overshadowed other elements of the film. Canby wrote that the film "owes more to [Trumbull, Dykstra and Michelson] than it does to the director, the writers or even the producer".

James Berardinelli , reviewing the film in , felt that the pace dragged and the plot bore too close a resemblance to the original series episode " The Changeling ", but considered the start and end of the film to be strong. The film is recognized by American Film Institute in these lists:.

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